The 5 Biggest Sports Bankruptcy’s Caused By Drug Abuse

May 18, 2016 by  
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Mike Tyson: $400 Million Earned and Bankrupt

Although there are a wide variety of reasons why Mike Tyson filed for bankruptcy in 2003, one really has to wonder how difficult it is to blow $400 million dollars in life time earnings. Recently in his book, Undisputed Truth, Tyson admitted to being high on cocaine before numerous of his title fights, which towards the end of his boxing career turned out to be epic failures. Tyson details his first experience with cocaine at the age of 11, which according to Tyson lead to a lifetime affair of cocaine, alcohol and marijuana binges.

Tyson recalls using a fake “whizzer” to avoid detection by boxing officials. In one episode, Tyson’s staff was not able to get him the “whizzer” in time, leading to a positive drug test for cocaine and a $200,000 fine. Tyson also notoriously “forgot” to grab his holdall while under the influence of cocaine and marijuana. What was in the holdall? $1 million. The Tyson story is a tragic tale of where drugs and alcohol can lead. While his divorces, legal fees, back taxes and sponsors lost have contributed to the disappearance of $400 million, it is safe to say that in a sober state of mind this erratic behavior might not have happened.

Theo Fleury: $50 Million Gone and Skating on Thin Ice

Theo Fleury was an undersized hockey player who made up for his disadvantages by being a downright beast on the ice. While he may have been ferocious on the ice, off it was a whole different story. Fleury points to his trials of drug and alcohol abuse stemming from being repeatedly molested by a junior hockey coach in his teen years.

In his tell-all book, Playing With Fire, Fleury notes how it isn’t at all very difficult to blow through $50 million. “It’s actually pretty easy to spend $50 million””it really is. You get divorced twice, and split it in half each time. You give the government half in taxes. You have three or four houses, seven or eight vehicles. You have huge problems with alcohol, drugs and gambling.”

In one night of partying in Chicago, Fleury spent an estimated $1.3 million on drugs, women and booze. It was also frequently reported that he kept the company of drug dealers, strippers and homeless people after his hockey games. His career ultimately ended after a drunken brawl in a strip club. According to Fleury he failed 13 drug tests in a row while playing for the New York Rangers. He alleges that since he was a top scorer the NHL turned a blind eye and allowed him to continue playing.

Lawrence Taylor: $50 Million and 6 Prostitutes A Day

Lawrence Taylor is famous for revolutionizing the linebacker position in professional football and also being one of the hardest hitters to ever play the game. In 1986 Taylor was honored with an MVP award after recording 20.5 sacks and winning the Super Bowl with the New York Giants. The following season Taylor tested positive for cocaine and after a second failed drug test in 1988 Taylor was suspended for 30 days. Taylor was once asked what the one thing he could do that other linebackers couldn’t. Taylor replied, “Drink.”

With the threat of a permanent ban from the league Taylor stayed off cocaine for five-years, but with retirement in sight he picked up the habit once more. “I saw coke as the only bright spot in my life,” Taylor said. Taylor would go on to be arrested twice over the next three years for trying to buy cocaine from undercover officers. In a 2004 interview with 60 Minutes, Taylor admitted to hiring up to six prostitutes a day and spending thousands of dollars on cocaine. He filed for bankruptcy in 1998 after having over $50 million in lifetime earnings.

Travis Henry: $25 Million and Drug Trafficking

Travis Henry was an NFL running back for the Buffalo Bills, Tennessee Titans and Denver Broncos. Henry had promising talent, although was laden with scattered positive tests for marijuana leading to lengthy suspensions. After being released from the Tennessee Titans, Henry signed a five-year $22.5 million contract with the Denver Broncos, who took a shot on the troubled back. Henry was able to win a federal appeal that would have suspended him from the league for one year for marijuana use. To the Broncos surprise, Henry once again tested positive for marijuana five months later. They released him in July of 2008 and a little more than two months later Henry was arrested by the DEA for being the financier of a multi-kilo cocaine trafficking ring.

Henry faced 10-years to life for committing the federal offense, but was able to reach a plea deal which saw him spend three years in federal prison. When given the choice between making $22.5 million or smoking marijuana, one would think that the decision would be a no-brainer, but in the world of drugs rationale is the first to go up in smoke.

Marion Jones: From Gold Medals to the Pen

Marion Jones was an American Olympian who won a record setting five track and field medals in the 2000 Sydney games. Throughout her career Jones had been accused using performance enhancing drugs, but since she had never tested positive for the substances there was not enough evidence to suspend or ban her from the sport.

Jones was found innocent in 2004 and 2006 after evidence began to mount against her steroid use. Her ex-husband C.J. Hunter testified against her saying that he had personally seen her inject the banned substance into her stomach. Finally in 2007 Jones admitted to using steroids before and after the 2000 Sydney games. Jones had also perjured herself by lying to federal agent during the 2004 investigation. Jones was stripped of her five Olympic medals and has arguably become one of the worst stories in the history of the Olympic games. She has since filed for bankruptcy after being sentenced to six months in federal prison.


 

Chad Arias has a B.A. in journalism and is a contributor for the Latino Post and Opposing Views. In his free time, Arias writes poetry, short stories and is currently working on a novel detailing his experiences with substance abuse. He is most interested on the philosophical and psychological aspects of the subject.

 

Treating Mental Health and Addiction: Our Flawed Approach

April 14, 2016 by  
Filed under People and Culture, Treatment and Recovery News

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146217Although substance abuse is generally left for the medical field to discuss, there are multiple faces of the issue, arguably the most important being the political and social spheres. Substance abuse is one of the leading callouses that has left America with the biggest prison population in the world. Instead of having accessible or inexpensive treatment centers, it is decently difficult if not impossible for an individual without medical insurance to receive treatment.

“For most people with addictions, there are many mental health problems that need attention. And for many people with mental health problems, substance misuse problems accompany and complicate the care of their mental health problems,” says Eric Collins, physician-in-chief at Siler Hill Hospital in new Canna, Conn.

These issues must be discussed in the public and political forums because legislation is the only way to establish a willful angle at tackling the greater issue. Incarceration may be looked at as an easy solution to getting substance abusers off the streets, but it costs tax payers a great deal of money and has been shown to be a vicious cycle of repeat offenders traveling in and out of prison multiple times for the rest of their lives.

Aside from the criminal aspects of substance abuse there is also the matter of 8.9 million American’s suffering from both mental illness and substance abuse issues. Of this figure, only 7.4 percent will be treated for both conditions and more than half will not receive any treatment at all according to a report from the National Alliance for Mental Illness.

According to Ron Manderscheid, executive director of the National Association of County Behavioral Health and Developmental Disability Directors, two-thirds of all people who suffer from substance abuse also have a mental illness. Their abusive habits combined with an impaired mental state make for a dangerous formula that puts the public at risk in terms of safety and also hits their pocket books in the form of incarceration tax dollars. To add a concrete figure to the notion of taxes, it roughly costs $70,000 per year per inmate, which is almost double what the nation spends per K-12 student.

The superseding point appears to be that mental illness, substance abuse, prisons and the public are all cemented to one another whether they like it or not. There is no easy way to say that this is a personal problem due to the large social impacts that are at stake. In recent years mental health has begun to be put on the forefront of American policy due in part to a large amount of shootings in which the accused were found to be suffering from various mental illnesses. It is only when the public sees what mental illness can cause that they become aware of how serious the problem really is. Moreover, when their children or loved ones could be affected by someone who has not received treatment for mental illness or substance abuse the matter becomes personal and is finally taken seriously.

There is no easy or simple way to combat each of these problems seeing as they form a complex network of victims, society and politicians. In 1998 Supplemental Security Income disallowed for substance abuse to be classified as being a disability. This in turn stopped Medicaid checks from going out and thus substance abusers without insurance could not afford to receive help. President Obama has sought to change this trend by introducing the Affordable Care Act, which hopefully will allow for those with mental illnesses and substance abuse problems to get the treatment they need at an affordable rate.

What remains unknown is how many in the mental illness and substance abuse category actually seek out help on their own accord. 24 million Americans suffer with substance abuse problems but only an estimated 2.5 million Americans go into rehabilitation centers every year. The general population cannot help those who don’t want to be helped, so it is quite possible that mandatory rehab stints should be implemented instead of sending criminal offenders to prison. Some of the responsibility must be placed on those who actually have the affliction, though this isn’t to say that it is their fault, just more their duty to society to try to get better.

Incarceration is currently the sham remedy in dealing with this demographic but by no means is it a solution; merely a Band-Aid hiding the fact that there is serious turmoil going on. A clear point must be made that whether or not the majority of Americans suffer from mental illness and substance abuse they are affected in one way or another by its byproducts. Society is only as great as it “˜lowest’ members and so to simply condemn them with bars instead of recovery is a chilling reality that must be curved by legislation and public sentiment. As stated earlier there is no easy fix but each faction of society must push forward together in order to come up with more cost efficient and effective solutions.


Chad Arias has a B.A. in journalism and is a contributor for the Latino Post and Opposing Views. In his free time, Arias writes poetry, short stories and is currently working on a novel detailing his experiences with substance abuse. He is most interested on the philosophical and psychological aspects of the subject.

Drunk Driving Decreases as Drug Driving on the Rise

March 17, 2016 by  
Filed under General Topics, Laws and Legalization

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While substance abuse is directly detrimental to the specific user’s health and overall well-being, the issue becomes a societal hazard when getting behind the wheel of a vehicle.

According to the CDC, an average of 30 American’s die every day from alcohol related crashes. In 2010, 1.4 million drivers were arrested for being under the influence, which is roughly 1 percent of the 112 million American’s who self-reported that they had had an episode of impaired driving.

With statistical totals of this magnitude, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has a vested interest in following the national trends of impaired driving. A recent study entitled, “2014 Roadside Survey of Alcohol and Drug Use by Drivers,” found that drivers with alcohol in their systems had decreased by more than one-third since 2007, but drivers with drugs or other inhibiting chemicals in their systems had increased to a 1 to 4 ratio.

Naturally, it is extremely difficult to classify or even narrow down the wide array of ‘inhibiting chemicals’ that drivers are testing positive for. Drunk driving has rather simple symptoms that have been clearly defined. Driving under the influence of marijuana, methamphetamines, opiates, pharmaceuticals, hallucinogens or stimulants creates an impossible classification process.

Since marijuana usage is arguably the most popular and widely used substance, the NHTSA has focused recent research on correlating whether or not there is a bridge between smoking marijuana and car crashes. The study found that pot users were 25 percent more likely to be involved in a car accident than a sober driver, but upon further investigation the statistics were found to be somewhat misleading.

When researchers factored in age and gender to their statistical analysis they found that young men were the most likely group to be involved in car crashes, but also the most likely to under the influence of marijuana. The objective was to see if there was a link between marijuana and car crashes, but the demographics make it all but impossible to tell if age or substance is the major factor in the crash.

“Once we controlled for those demographic factors, we did not find a significantly higher crash risk among marijuana users as compared to those who did not have marijuana in their system,” NHTSA spokesman Gordon Trowbridge said.

The issue grows even more complex when trying to classify different levels of chemically impaired driving. A Breathalyzer test will immediately determine the severity of a person’s alcohol intake, but it is far more difficult to conclude “how high” an individual is. There are a slew of factors that go into the issue depending on the substance and the amount ingested.

Overall what can be concluded is that the recent NHTSA studies show signs of progress when it comes to impaired driving. While there isn’t necessarily a preferable chemical to be ingesting behind the wheel of a vehicle, alcohol can be looked at as having the most potential for negative impact. Since the research clearly shows that drunk driving statistics are down from their previous totals, education as well as legislation seem to be having a positive effect.

With drunk driving on the decline the NHTSA will likely continue to research and lobby for an increased focus on driving while under the influence of other chemicals. In 2007 survey research showed that 16.3 percent drivers were under the influence of a substance, but in 2014 the total had jumped to 20 percent. Drivers with marijuana in their systems also increased from 9 percent in 2007 to 13 percent in 2014.

As stated earlier, driving under the influence of anything can be extremely dangerous seeing as how thousands of pounds of metal traveling at high rates of speed possess a physics nightmare for the driver and anyone else within eyeshot. While the NHTSA research looks to be promising there is still a great deal to be done to ensure the safety of all drivers at all times.


Chad Arias has a B.A. in journalism and is a contributor for the Latino Post and Opposing Views. In his free time, Arias writes poetry, short stories and is currently working on a novel detailing his experiences with substance abuse. He is most interested on the philosophical and psychological aspects of the subject.

Treating Mental Health Disorders and Addiction: Our Flawed Approach

February 18, 2016 by  
Filed under Health, Treatment and Recovery News

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Although substance abuse is generally left for the medical field to discuss, the issue has multiple faces, arguably the most important being the political and social spheres. Substance abuse is one of the leading callouses that has left America with the biggest prison population in the world. Instead of having accessible or inexpensive treatment centers, it is decently difficult–if not impossible–for an individual without medical insurance to receive treatment.

“For most people with addictions, there are many mental health problems that need attention. And for many people with mental health problems, substance misuse problems accompany and complicate the care of their mental health problems,” says Eric Collins, physician-in-chief at Siler Hill Hospital in new Canna, Connecticut.

These issues must be discussed in the public and political forums because legislation is the only way to establish a willful angle at tackling the greater issue. Incarceration may be looked at as an easy solution to getting substance abusers off the streets, but it costs tax payers a great deal of money and has been shown to be a vicious cycle of repeat offenders traveling in and out of prison multiple times for the rest of their lives.

Aside from the criminal aspects of substance abuse there is also the matter of 8.9 million Americans suffering from both mental illness and substance abuse issues. Of this figure, only 7.4 percent will be treated for both conditions and more than half will not receive any treatment at all according to a report from the National Alliance for Mental Illness.

According to Ron Manderscheid, executive director of the National Association of County Behavioral Health and Developmental Disability Directors, two-thirds of all people who suffer from substance abuse also have mental illnesses. Their abusive habits combined with an impaired mental state make for a dangerous formula that puts the public at risk in terms of safety and also hits their pocket books in the form of incarceration tax dollars. To add a concrete figure to the notion of taxes, it roughly costs $70,000 per year per inmate, which is almost double what the nation spends per K-12 student.

The superseding point appears to be that mental illness, substance abuse, prisons and the public are all cemented to one another whether they like it or not. There is no easy way to say that this is a personal problem due to the large social impacts that are at stake. In recent years, mental health has begun to be put on the forefront of American policy due in part to a large amount of shootings in which the accused were found to be suffering from various mental illnesses. It is only when the public sees what mental illness can cause that they become aware of how serious the problem really is. Moreover, when their children or loved ones could be affected by someone who has not received treatment for mental illness or substance abuse the matter becomes personal and is finally taken seriously.

There is no easy or simple way to combat each of these problems seeing as they form a complex network of victims, society and politicians. In 1998 Supplemental Security Income disallowed for substance abuse to be classified as being a disability. This in turn stopped Medicaid checks from going out and thus substance abusers without insurance could not afford to receive help. President Obama has sought to change this trend by introducing the Affordable Care Act, which hopefully will allow for those with mental illnesses and substance abuse problems to get the treatment they need at an affordable rate.

What remains unknown is how many in the mental illness and substance abuse category actually seek out help on their own accord. An estimated 24 million Americans suffer with substance abuse problems but only about 2.5 million go into rehabilitation centers every year. The general population cannot help those who don’t want to be helped, so it is quite possible that mandatory rehab stints should be implemented instead of sending criminal offenders to prison. Some of the responsibility must be placed on those who actually have the affliction, though this isn’t to say that it is their fault, just more their duty to society to try to get better.

Incarceration is currently the sham remedy in dealing with this demographic but by no means is it a solution; merely a Band-Aid hiding the fact that there is serious turmoil going on. A clear point must be made that whether or not the majority of Americans suffer from mental illness and substance abuse they are affected in one way or another by its byproducts. Society is only as great as it ‘lowest’ members and so to simply condemn them with bars instead of recovery is a chilling reality that must be curved by legislation and public sentiment. As stated earlier there is no easy fix but each faction of society must push forward together in order to come up with more cost efficient and effective solutions.


Chad Arias has a B.A. in journalism and is a contributor for the Latino Post and Opposing Views. In his free time, Arias writes poetry, short stories and is currently working on a novel detailing his experiences with substance abuse. He is most interested on the philosophical and psychological aspects of the subject.

6 Craziest Crimes Done While Under the Influence

February 11, 2016 by  
Filed under Health, People and Culture

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There’s an old Alcoholic Anonymous adage that goes, “I’m allergic to alcohol. Every time I drink it I break out in handcuffs.” While this is a lighthearted attempt at dealing with a very serious issue, drugs and alcohol have been consistently shown to reduce social anxiety so much so that a user’s conscious is no longer able to prevent them from committing egregious acts. In the case of heavier substances users, they can even be locked in a state of psychosis, where for whatever reason they decide to partake in some of America’s oddest criminal acts.

The following stories briefly seek to account for some of the most outrageous behavior seen by officers and witnesses while apprehending the usually oblivious suspects. There are a wide variety of health and economic reasons why an individual should abstain from abusing drugs and alcohol, but there is also the commonly forgotten reason of simply “staying out of jail.” Depending upon the severity of the substance, anything can happen once it is drunk, snorted, smoked or shot.

1. Naked, Frostbitten and Bath Salts

Logan Valle, 18, is accused of breaking into two houses while naked and allegedly under the influence of bath salts. During his naked romp around the city, Valle suffered frostbite due to the frigid Maine temperatures. Valle entered the first residence as the homeowners sat watching television. He took the car keys off the counter and proceeded to try and start each of the three family cars. After being threatened by the homeowners, Valle ran to another residence where he smashed through the family’s front door. While inside, Valle put on some tennis shoes before police arrived. Oddly enough, police were already on their way to the Valle residence after a fire was set that engulfed the house. So far, no connection has been made between the fire and Valle’s naked rampage.

2. Stargazing Meth-User Trapped in Wall For Three Days

Paul Felyk, 35, pulled into the parking lot of a local Denver Marshalls, where he proceeded to smoke methamphetamine. After admiring how the starry sky looked, Felyk decided that he needed a closer view. Felyk climbed on top of the Marshalls roof and accidentally fell 20-feet through a void area, pinning him in an inescapable position. After three days, Felyk came to the realization that he was not going make it out, unless he called for help. Upon rescue, Felyk was arrested and preceded to tell officers that the trouble started when his female friend who was “unknowingly part of a drug-trafficking ring that utilizes time travel, identity theft and real-estate fraud to move drugs.”

3. Burglar on Bath Salts Forgets About Robbery and Puts Up Victims Christmas Decorations Instead

Terry Trent, 44, allegedly began his night by snorting a line of bath salts. After the substance had taken affect he decided that his next best move would be to go commit a burglary. While inside an Ohio home, Trent forgot about his original intentions and instead decided to put up the victim’s Christmas decorations. Trent then sat down and watched television until the family’s son came home to discover the strung-out interior designer.

4. Man Asks Officer For a Ride Home, Forgets He Has Cocaine in His Pocket

After an early Sunday morning party had ended, Ongley Raymond Ocon III, 19, approached a local police cruiser where he asked if the officer could take him home. It is unknown if officers are frequently asked for rides home, but the suspicious officer plainly asked if Ocon was carrying anything illegal on him. According to the officer Ocon answered, “Yes, but then paused and said no.” Ocon was subsequently arrested and charged with cocaine possession.

5. Man Dies After Eating Ounce of Cocaine Out of Brother’s “Backside”

In a truly tragic tale, two brothers were arrested based on allegations that there were drugs inside their car. While in the backseat of the squad car, Deangelo Mitchell, 23, convinced his younger brother Wayne Mitchell, 20, to eat more than an ounce of cocaine that was hidden inside his brothers “backside.” After ingesting the cocaine Mitchell died hours later due to cocaine overdose.

6. Woman on PCP Decapitates 2-Year-Old Son

While under the influence of PCP, Chevonne Thompson decapitated her 2-year-old son and put his head in the freezer. Thompson then called 9-1-1 where she initially blamed her boyfriend for the act before telling the dispatcher, “You know what, I don’t even want to play this. I did it. Ok? I did it.” Thompson then stabbed herself in the neck and later died from the injuries.

Although some of these stories are humorous in nature, there is no limit to the atrocious crimes that can be committed while under the influence of drugs and alcohol.


Chad Arias has a B.A. in journalism and is a contributor for the Latino Post and Opposing Views. In his free time, Arias writes poetry, short stories and is currently working on a novel detailing his experiences with substance abuse. He is most interested on the philosophical and psychological aspects of the subject.

People Smoke More Cigarettes If They Also Smoke Pot

December 24, 2015 by  
Filed under People and Culture

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Scientists have become increasingly interested in the correlations between smoking marijuana and smoking tobacco. With the recent waves of marijuana legalization spreading through states such as Oregon and Washington the question is quickly becoming what will be the unforeseen consequences and byproducts that legalization will create.

A recent study conducted by Dr. Megan Moreno, an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington, sought to calculate if smoking marijuana as well as tobacco would lead to more frequent usage as opposed to merely smoking one substance.

Moreno’s study focused on 315 subjects who were interviewed about their previous smoking habits before entering their freshmen year of college. After their freshmen year there was a final interview conducted to track if those who smoked both substances used tobacco more frequently than those who only smoked one. The underlying premise focused on addiction spreading to multiple fronts in an individual. This has been previously seen to be true in a wide variety of co-occurring addictions that range from alcohol and tobacco to alcohol and pharmaceuticals.

The initial student interviews held by Moreno found that 43 percent of the subjects were currently smoking tobacco. Current tobacco users were also more likely to have smoked marijuana than those who did not smoke tobacco. The ending interview showed that of the 43 percent who had acknowledged their daily use of tobacco, two-thirds of students continued on with their habit. 53 percent of students also reported that they were using marijuana on a concurrent basis.

In order to track the direct relationship between concurrent marijuana and tobacco use, the students were observed for a 28-day period in which their intake of both substances was tracked. Students who smoked both marijuana and tobacco were seen to have an average of 42 tobacco related episodes a month, compared to only 24 tobacco episodes from those who only smoked cigarettes.

“These findings are significant because in the past year we have seen legislation passed that legalizes marijuana in two states. While the impact of these laws on marijuana use is a critical issue, our findings suggest that we should also consider whether increased marijuana use will impact tobacco use among older adolescents,” said Moreno.

There will always be a battle between marijuana and tobacco users over the issue of which one presents more dramatic health dangers. However, when an individual uses both substances at the same time, their intake frequency dramatically increases. This can only suggest that if you must smoke something at least choose one and not both.


Chad Arias has a B.A. in journalism and is a contributor for the Latino Post and Opposing Views. In his free time, Arias writes poetry, short stories and is currently working on a novel detailing his experiences with substance abuse. He is most interested on the philosophical and psychological aspects of the subject.

Addictions in Iran Rise Despite Death Penalty

November 26, 2015 by  
Filed under Laws and Legalization, People and Culture

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TGDG Addiction in Iran

Despite appeals to the United Nations by various human rights groups, Iran remains insistent that their drug trafficking laws will continue to be enforced via the death penalty.

In 2013, Iran put to death 331 drug offenders, an astounding number that was surpassed in 2014, all but showing that the harsh penalties for trafficking are not curving the nations drug problem.

Iran is a hot spot for opium trafficking due to its 560-mile border with Afghanistan. Afghanistan is the world’s largest opium producer, accounting for an estimated 90 percent of the worlds supply.

Faced with neighboring country and poor drug education, 2 percent of the Iranian population is addicted to opiates, making it one of the highest substance abusing countries in the world.

The obvious point is that Iran has a drug problem and they are well aware of the future implications that will occur if these trends continue. The Iranian government takes the numbers seriously, but so far their tactics have been unsuccessful seeing how each year more and more drug traffickers are being put to death.

Mohammad Javad Larijani, the secretary of Iran’s Human Rights Council, has spoken out about the harsh penalties and their obvious ineffectiveness when it comes to battling addiction. Although Larijani told France’s 24 News that, “We are crusading to change this law,” the Iranian government has shown no signs of changing their policy.

International law offers the provision that if a nation chooses to institute the death penalty, they may only use it for the most heinous of crimes. The United Nations does not include drug offenses as warranting capital punishment.

In terms of political and international pressure being placed on Iran, the issue of capital punishment for drug offenders largely takes a backseat to the supposed greater issue of Iran’s nuclear program. The overall policy seems to constitute a “lesser evil” philosophy where in which capital punishment is being ignored.

Iran’s borders are not going anywhere and despite burning over 100 metric tons of confiscated substances, drug trafficking continues to thrive. In order to combat the problem Iran seemingly must introduce new tactics such as better treatment facilities and drug education so that the nations youth can be better prepared for the society that they will engage with.


Chad Arias has a B.A. in journalism and is a contributor for the Latino Post and Opposing Views. In his free time, Arias writes poetry, short stories and is currently working on a novel detailing his experiences with substance abuse. He is most interested on the philosophical and psychological aspects of the subject.

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